Posts tagged Beyonce
WSH's Fourth Annual (Not Very) Highly Scientific Ranking of the Year's Best Songs • #4

While “APESHIT” is the obvious choice for a year-end list, the stadium anthem with the pop appeal, and “HEARD ABOUT US” is my subjective favorite (I need to roller-skate to that song within the next 90 days, for real), “BLACK EFFECT” expertly manifests the blackness of their love in a way that makes my heart smile, the album’s very believable reminder that their accumulated wealth does not mean they’ve forsaken the revolution. In fact, they seem to argue that their access to particular resources makes them a greater asset to their people — and therefore a pretty significant threat to the status quo, should they choose to be. And they’re not wrong: from Hov highlighting his recent, exaggerated run-ins with law enforcement to Beyoncé articulating the importance of a black woman’s mere existence in places of high society, neither of them have been reticent in discussing their blackness in relation to their success. Now raising 3 children of their own and fully committed to each other while still at the peak of their respective musical powers, what better time than now to show their babies and the world that they’re in this together? Maybe the revolution will be televised, all things considered. The Carters might own a television station next.

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Mel Washington on J. Cole, standom, Starbucks + other related topics (Ep. 8)

Originally recorded April 21, project curator Larry J. Sanders welcomes Melvin Washington to discuss the new J. Cole album (4:40), Cole as social media punchline (6:30), whether fame and authenticity can mesh (16:40), standom and its effect on art (20:45), the Starbucks controversy (25:55), and how to keep systemic issues in the national conversation in 2018 (30:00).

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Lórenzo J’s Mid-Aughts Music Review, Week 3.5

Aside from “Irreplaceable” — which is definitely the people’s champ of that album — and “Ring the Alarm,” which I can definitely admit to overrating because of the music video, “Kitty Kat” emerged as my personal favorite, a four-minute farewell to a (now-former?) lover, Bey setting him straight for choosing apparently everything else over fulfilling her sexual needs. I was 14 the first time I’d heard this song; I honestly don’t think I realized to what the song’s title was referring until I was much older. Didn’t really care. The beat is immaculate — produced by Pharrell and Chad, because of course — and she sounds like such a boss the entire track. On what definitely has to be considered a statement album, “Kitty Kat” might not be the loudest declaration, but it is definitely the most unabashed. She’s unapologetic throughout B’Day, but her cool on “Kitty Kat” takes it up just a notch. This is “know yourself; know your worth” years before Aubrey said it, “if you don’t want me, then don’t talk to me” without any of Fantasia’s heartbreak. Beyoncé doesn’t need you. Don’t you ever for a second get to thin... wait, that’s an entirely different song. Regardless, you get the point.

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The Third Annual WSH (Not Very) Highly Scientific Ranking of the Year's Best Songs, Day Five

“Family Feud” is a piece of a larger tapestry, of course, but, similar to “LUST.” on Kendrick Lamar’s DAMN., "Family Feud" is 4:44’s axis; feuding with others — and most crucially, himself — led to this album’s creation in the first place. It’s not so difficult to live a decent life; if we all treated others with the care and consideration we'd like to experience ourselves, we’d live in a much happier world. But our lustful, self-serving impulses tend to handicap us in the worst possible ways, and until we recognize these impulses as more detrimental to the collective good than as beneficial to our personal individual goals, we’ll continue to see the same negative results.

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